A peace agreement between the government and the NNC was signed in 1975. The NNC, dubbed the Shillong Agreement, has promised to give up arms, but several senior NNC leaders have not endorsed the deal and have broken up to push their own factions. One such group was the NSCN, which then split into an NSCN (I-M) group. The agreement, published by NSCN-IM, called for “sovereign power sharing” and provides for a “sustainable relationship, including a new relationship of peaceful coexistence between the two entities.” In 1997, the NSCN (I-M) signed a ceasefire agreement with the government. [3] The agreement ensured that, although the government did not put pressure on counterinsurgency operations against the NSCN (I-M) team and its leaders, the rebels would not target the armed forces. The statement was issued for the first time because the (NSCN-IM) and the Centre intended to conceal the sensitive details mentioned in the agreement. In declaring its opposition to what was said in the commission`s report, the NSCN tried to tell the Naga public that it had not abandoned its previous position, and it was only NSCN that was trying to get the best offer for people against adversity. This avowed perseverance can also be interpreted as an attempt to reject Ravi`s efforts to involve more actors in the peace process, in order to probably weaken the NSCN`s position as the main peace negotiator. The NSCN said it had so far renounced the publication of the agreement, which respects “the tacit agreement between the two parties not to be made public for India`s security reasons.” He said that Mr. Ravi had taken an unwarranted advantage and began modifying and manipulating the agreement to mislead the Nagas and the center. It is interesting to note that other Naga groups had previously signed a nine-point agreement — in June 1947 — known as Naga-Akbar Hyderi (then governor of Assam).

Phizo refused. In 1951, Phizo claimed 99 percent support in a referendum for a “sovereign state of Naga.” In making the FA public, the NSCN stressed that Ravi had “doctored” the original agreement and that he may therefore have acted beyond the New Delhi mission and that he had to be withdrawn because he had broken his self-confidence. But it`s definitely about more. Sunday`s statement from NSCN-IM also stated that while Ravi often referred to a “problem, a solution,” he signed two agreements – framework agreements with NSCN (IM) and a position agreed with the NNPG. The ceasefire agreement was signed in 1997 and a peace process began. In 2003, Atal Bihari Vajpayee went to Nagaland as Prime Minister. His visit sparked goodwill for the peace process. Vajpayee won hearts by beginning his speech in the language of the country and praising Nagaland`s “unique history” and the contribution of the Naga people in the crucial moments of the India-China War of 1962 and the Indo-Pakistan Wars of 1965, 1971 and 1999. He said: “With `included`, this means that all Naga must be included in the agreement in different administrative units and political camps. The coexistence of the two entities is self-explanatory. This means that the two peoples and the two nations will coexist. Political and legal experts recognize that the concepts of “coexistence” and “shared sovereignty” apply to two entities, not one.

The Nagas will co-exist with India, which shares sovereign powers, as agreed in the framework agreement and defined in jurisdiction. But they will not merge with India. However, it is unlikely that the NSCN IM group will be able to take on large-scale weapons, given that they do not have a combat team after the 1997 ceasefire agreement. The political attitude of the state has changed a great deal and support for Muivah has diminished over the years in Nagaland.

sumitA peace agreement between the government and the NNC was signed in 1975. The NNC, dubbed the Shillong Agreement, has promised to give up arms, but several senior NNC leaders have not endorsed the deal and have broken up to push their own factions. One such group was the...Birthday Wishes, Quotes, Gifts and Cards